Nighttime blabbering 352

Ah, I am coming close to that anniversary. Viola the Demonslayer suggested to me that I should make a special post for when the day comes and talk about ghosts. That’s kind of nice since Halloween is around the corner. But there is a problem. I haven’t found anything related to ghosts in Slavic mythos and I don’t recall any ghost stories from childhood. I guess, Slavs are not big on ghost stories, but rather creatures and shadow dwelling monsters.

Anything remotely concerning ghosts is what we got from other cultures. That counts the white mist-like specters, sheets overhead, two black dots for eyes, that sort of stuff. No Slav version of what ghost is, like we don’t believe in them and we don’t find them all that scary. I mean, there are far scarier things in my culture than ghosts, so naturally, the ghost can count as beginner’s level of fears.

The closest we have to a ghost and idea of a wandering soul would be Karakondžula. And Karakondžula is a borrowed belief coming from Greek mythos. Yeah, I know, not even Slavic. The origins are from Greece, but the word itself is Turcic. KARA for black, and don’t dare use this word freely in your everyday convo with a Slav, because it is a synonym for penis and Kondžula for the monster. Connect it, you get something similar to a behemoth or something similar. And karakondžula is almost the same with Drekavac (dreka – noise, vac – derivation, masculine, the one who does/do/perform). I even did a story about that thing. Both of them prey on the passengers in the night, jump on their shoulders and make them carry them through the woods until the dawn. When the first sun rays peep over the hills, the creatures flee into the dark, leaving their victims to fall dead from exhaustion.

I tell you this because I decided to tell you something scarier than the ghost, drekavac or karakodžul. What that might be, well, be patient.

Little Grey Russian Blue Cat With Blue Eyes Looking In Camera

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